Categories
Microsoft Graph

How to export Microsoft Teams chats

Looking to export chats within Microsoft Teams? Exporting chats from Teams is an oft-requested feature, but at the moment there’s no out of the box functionality available for end users.

If you’re an end user

Looking for an easy way to export Teams chats? Check out our new Chat Exporter for Microsoft Teams tool. You can export conversations as CSV, JSON or PNG files.

If you’re using a personal Microsoft account with Teams, you may be able to export your messages following the steps listed here.

For work accounts, one option is to setup a workflow using Microsoft Flow to call the Microsoft Graph API and convert individual chats to HTML or a PDF file.

An alternative is to call the Graph API endpoints yourself to retrieve messages and conversations yourself as part of your own script/program, although that has a higher degree of complexity when compared to using a tool such as Microsoft Flow. These endpoints are also in beta.

You could also open the Microsoft Teams website in your browser (Chrome or Edge) and use a full page screenshot extension to capture a conversation. Note however that you’ll need to manually scroll back through the chat to ensure that the full history is shown.

If you’re an admin

The options are still quite limited, but you can try and use the eDiscovery tools available in Office 365 to retrieve messages from channels.

Categories
Cloud

Integrating Gumroad and WordPress

Gumroad is one of the hottest new ways for creatives to sell their products and services online. And with WordPress being one of the most popular content management systems in the world right now, in this post we’ll explore how you can connect both systems together to offer paid products and services from your WordPress blog.

There are 3 ways in which you can connect Gumroad with your WordPress site:

  • Via the free, official Gumroad plugin
  • Using the HTML embed codes
  • Via a paid third-party WordPress plugin

Free, official Gumroad plugin

Free (WordPress Plugin Marketplace)

This is the easiest free way to connect Gumroad and your website. You simply install the free Gumroad plugin from the Plugins section of your WordPress administration site.

The plugin adds a Gutenberg block that can be used within your content.

Unfortunately that’s about as advanced as you can get when using the official plugin. There’s no support for syncing paying customers between Gumroad and WordPress for sites such as online courses or membership areas. For that you’ll need to use a third-party plugin.

HTML embed codes

Gumroad provides HTML code that you can manually insert on your product pages within WordPress.

You can choose from an overlay, where a customer performs the entire flow from within a modal window on your site or an embed which can redirect customers to the Gumroad site to complete the transaction.

To generate the code, simply open your product within the Gumroad website, click “Share” and copy and paste the code from either “Overlay” or “Embed” into your WordPress post.

3rd-party WordPress plugin

If you’re looking for something more advanced – perhaps to restrict your content & blog posts to paying customers – then you may want to turn to a premium third-party WordPress plugin.

ProductPress (paid, pricing starting at $39) is one of the more established products in this space, allowing you to setup sites for things like online courses and membership sites.

These plugins rely on the Gumroad API to integrate deeper into your WordPress installation – so make sure if you are using a third-party plugin that it’s legitimate and not going to compromise your customer data or Gumroad account.

Categories
Azure Azure DevOps

Getting started with Azure Bicep

Bicep is a new language from Microsoft that allows you to easily specify your Azure infrastructure as code.

It’s an improvement on writing Azure Resource Manager (ARM) templates directly by better supporting features such as type safety and code modularity and reuse.

That said, Bicep still has a very close relationship with ARM templates. In fact, it’s an abstraction over ARM templates with templates written using Bicep able to be transpiled back to ARM templates. And if you have a bunch of existing ARM templates, they can be transpiled and converted into Bicep files.

Let’s now take a look at how you can get started using Bicep.

Preparing your environment

There’s a few things you’ll want to install in order to start using Bicep.

First you’ll want to download Visual Studio Code (free) and install the Bicep extension (also free). This will give you an editor in which to write your Bicep files, and the extension adds handy features such as Intellisense code suggestions and template validation to ensure the correct syntax.

You’ll also need to install the Bicep command line interface (CLI). The easiest, cross-platform way to do this is by installing the Azure command line interface. But if you’re after an alternative, see this list.

Become a Bicep guru

Dive deeper into Bicep with our getting started with Bicep course on Udemy today!

Writing your first Bicep file

Open Visual Studio Code, and create a new file called HelloWorld.bicep. In it, paste the following code:

resource appConfig 'Microsoft.AppConfiguration/[email protected]' = {
  name: 'bicepDemoAppConfig'
  location: 'westus2'
  sku: {
    name: 'standard'
  }
}

In this template, we’re creating an App Configuration service in Azure. Lets breakdown the template:

appConfig provides a local resource name for use within the template if you need to refer to this resource as a dependency, or from within another resource.

Microsoft.AppConfiguration/[email protected] refers to the resource type and the values that can be configured. See this Microsoft documentation for a full list of resource types.

As such, name, location and sku are all values that can be set for the resource type.

Next steps

To learn how to deploy this template, or to find out about more advanced Bicep topics including for loops, conditional statements and modularised templates check out our Udemy course on getting started with Bicep.

Categories
Cloud

Setting Digital Ocean environment variables

Are you trying to work out how to setup environment variables for your Digital Ocean droplet or app running on the app platform? Here’s how.

Digital Ocean droplet environment variables

Setting an environment variable for a droplet is a little more complicated than for an app running on the app platform.

Follow these steps to set environment variables on a Linux droplet:

  1. SSH into your droplet. If you’re not sure how to do that, see here
  2. Once connected, run the following command to set your environment variable:
export YOUR_VARIABLE_KEY=<your-variable-value>

App platform environment variables

To set environment variables for an app running on Digital Ocean’s app platform, follow these steps:

  1. Login to the Digital Ocean portal
  2. Open your app
  3. Click the “Settings” tab
  4. Scroll down until you see “App-Level Environment Variables”
  5. Click “Edit” and add the environment variable key and value
  6. Click “Save”

Your environment variable will now be available for your app.

Categories
Azure

How to create an Azure app service with a database

Need to deploy your app to an Azure app service, and rely on a database such as Postgres or Azure SQL?

Microsoft is now previewing a new blade in the Azure portal that lets you quickly spin up an Azure app service with an associated database.

Supported database engines for the preview are Postgres or serverless Azure SQL server.

To get started using the new blade, click here or search the Azure Marketplace for “web app database”.

The blade – currently in preview – is fairly basic compared to the normal app service blade, but allows you to specify the app name, runtime and database engine. You can also set the server name and database name.

By default it’ll spin up an app service using the Premium V2 tier, but you can scale this down (or up if required) once the service is created using the regular Azure scale up settings.

The database connection information will automatically be set as environment variables for your app service.

Categories
Google Tables

How to use Google Tables outside the US

Google recently launched a new product called Tables – a lightweight database similar to the likes of Airtable.

However being in beta, and launched by Google’s incubator Area 120, it’s only officially available in the United States for now.

But if you’re outside the US, at least for now you can still access Tables using the following method. Note that the usual caveats apply, in that Google may block this at any time and your success may vary.

  1. Sign up for a free trial of a VPN with a United States point of presence, such as encrypt.me
  2. Configure your computer/Mac/phone to use the VPN. Normally that involves downloading an app provided by your VPN provider.
  3. Enable the VPN, and open the Google Tables site. Click “Get started” in the top right-hand corner to login.
  4. You should get prompted to sign in with your Google Account. Enter your Google credentials, and as long as your VPN is active you should be able to login and start using Tables.
  5. If you’re not able to login still, make sure your VPN is located in the United States. To configure this in encrypt.me, go to Preferences > Transporter > North America > United States and choose a location.